STI blood screen full

£132.00+ visit fee (from £24.00)

STD5

5 tests included

1 working day

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Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), also called sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or venereal diseases, are infections caused by organisms that can be transmitted from one person to another through sexual activity and intimate contact. This profile detects HIV and Syphilis, Hepatitis B and C in the blood sample.

About

In the UK, approximately 180,000 people are chronically infected with hepatitis. In some inner-city areas, with a high percentage of people from parts of the world where the virus is common, as many as one in 60 pregnant women may be infected. Since many STDs have few or no symptoms, it is possible for a person to have an infection and to infect others without either of them knowing it. For this reason, screening for these infections is important to ensure early detection and prompt treatment. Tests for STDs are recommended as part of routine health screens for sexually active teens and young adults as well as older adults who may be at risk.

Preparation

No test preparation is needed.

Indications

An STI profile plus may be ordered when a person has risk factors or signs and symptoms of STD. Anyone who is sexually active risks some degree of exposure to a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Factors that may increase that risk includes:
  • Having unprotected sex. Vaginal or anal penetration by an infected partner who isn't wearing a latex condom significantly increases the risk of getting an STI. Improper or inconsistent use of condoms can also increase your risk.Oral sex may be less risky, but infections can still be transmitted without a latex condom or a dental dam — a thin, square piece of rubber made with latex or silicone.
  • Having sexual contact with multiple partners. The more people you have sexual contact with, the greater your risk. This is true for concurrent partners as well as monogamous consecutive relationships.
  • Having a history of STIs. Having one STI makes it much easier for another STI to take hold.
  • Anyone forced to have sexual intercourse or sexual activity. Dealing with rape or assault can be difficult, but it's important to see a doctor as soon as possible so that you can receive screening, treatment and emotional support.
  • Misuse of alcohol or use of recreational drugs. Substance misuse can inhibit your judgment, making you more willing to participate in risky behaviours.
  • Injecting drugs. Needle sharing spreads many serious infections, including HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C.
  • Being young. Half the STIs occur in people between the ages of 15 and 24.
  • Men who request prescriptions for drugs to treat erectile dysfunction. Men who ask their doctors for prescriptions for drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra, Revatio), tadalafil (Cialis, Adcirca) and vardenafil (Levitra) have higher rates of STIs. Be sure you are up to date on safe sex practices if you ask your doctor for one of these medications.
Signs and symptoms that might indicate an STI include:
  • Sores or bumps on the genitals or in the oral or rectal area
  • Painful or burning urination
  • Discharge from the penis
  • Unusual or odd-smelling vaginal discharge
  • Unusual vaginal bleeding
  • Pain during sex
  • Sore, swollen lymph nodes, particularly in the groin but sometimes more widespread
  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Fever
  • A rash over the trunk, hands or feet
Signs and symptoms may appear a few days after exposure, or it may take years before you have any noticeable problems, depending on the organism.

Interpretation

HIV


If HIV antibodies are found, then a confirmatory HIV screen is recommended to be sure of the results.


Syphilis


A positive treponemal test suggests infection with T pallidum, but does not distinguish between recent or past, or treated and untreated infection. This is because treponemal tests may remain reactive for life, even following adequate therapy. Therefore, the results of a nontreponemal assay, such as RPR, are needed to provide information on a patient’s disease state and history of therapy.


In some patients, the results of the treponemal screening test and RPR may be discordant (eg, syphilis IgG/IgM positive and RPR negative). To discriminate between a falsely reactive screening result and past syphilis, a second treponemal-specific antibody test is recommended using a method that is different from the initial screen test (eg, T pallidum particle agglutination: TP-PA).


In the setting of a positive syphilis IgG/IgM screening result and a negative RPR, a positive TP-PA result is consistent with either 1) past, successfully treated syphilis, 2) early syphilis with undetectable RPR titers or 3) late/latent syphilis in patients who do not have a history of treatment for syphilis. Further historical evaluation is necessary to distinguish between these scenarios.


In the setting of a positive syphilis IgG/IgM screening result and a negative RPR, a negative TP-PA result is most consistent with a falsely reactive syphilis IgG/IgM screen. If syphilis remains clinically suspected, a second specimen should be submitted for testing.


Hepatitis B


A “positive” or “reactive” HBsAg test result means that the person is infected with hepatitis B. This test can detect the actual presence of the hepatitis B virus (called the “surface antigen”) in your blood. If a person tests “positive,” then further testing is needed to determine if this is a new “acute” infection or a “chronic” hepatitis B infection. A positive HBsAg test result means that you are infected and can spread the hepatitis B virus to others through your blood.


Hepatitis C


If the antibody test result is positive, you have probably been infected with hepatitis C, even if it was so mild you did not realise you had it.


A repeat antibody or antibody/antigen test will usually be requested or possibly a viral load.

Disclaimer

The laboratory test results are NOT to be interpreted as results of a "stand-alone" test. The test results have to be interpreted after correlating with suitable clinical findings and additional supplemental tests/information. Your healthcare providers will explain the meaning of your tests results, based on the overall clinical scenario. Certain medications that you may be currently taking may influence the outcome of the test. Hence, it is important to inform your healthcare provider of the complete list of medications (including any herbal supplements) you are currently taking. This will help the healthcare provider interpret your test results more accurately and avoid unnecessary chances of a misdiagnosis.

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