Laboratory Tests

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Sample types

Conditions

Organ Related

Organ System

Purpose

Test Category

  • B

    Glucose (capillary)

    RBG

    Fasting or random blood glucose via finger-prick sample. This test is used to determine if your blood glucose level is within a healthy range; if you have symptoms suggesting hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia, or if you are pregnant. If you have diabetes, you may be required to monitor glucose levels several times a day.

    Immediate

    £12.00

    Excludes visit fee

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  • U

    Albumin

    ALBU

    Albumin in urine most often occurs when either the glomeruli or tubules in the kidney are damaged. Inflammation and/or scarring of the glomeruli can allow increasing amounts of protein to leak into the urine. Damage to the tubules can prevent protein from being reabsorbed. This test makes semi-quantitative measurement of albumin in the morning urine sample.

    Same day

    £12.00

    Excludes visit fee

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  • U

    Urinalysis

    PU1

    A urinalysis is used to detect and manage a wide range of disorders, such as urinary tract infections, kidney disease and diabetes.

    Same day

    £15.00

    Excludes visit fee

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  • B

    Chloride (Cl-)

    CL

    Chloride is an electrolyte. When combined with sodium it is mostly found in nature as “salt.” Chloride is important in maintaining the normal acid-base balance of the body and, along with sodium, in keeping normal levels of water in the body. Chloride generally increases or decreases in direct relationship to sodium, but may change without any change in sodium when there are problems with too much acid or base in your body. Chloride is taken into the body through food. Most of the chloride is absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract, and the excess is excreted in the urine. The normal blood concentration remains steady, with a slight drop after meals (because the stomach produces hydrochloric acid after eating, using chloride from blood).

    1 working day

    £24.00

    Excludes visit fee

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  • B

    Prothrombin Time (PT/INR)

    PTIM

    The test measures how long it takes for your blood to begin to form clots. Prothrombin is a plasma protein produced by the liver. Clotting is caused by a series of clotting factors which activate each other, including the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. The test used to measure the activity of this clotting factor is called the prothrombin time or PT. A tightly controlled version of the PT called the International Normalised Ratio (INR) is used to measure the effect of anticoagulant drugs such as warfarin.

    Same day

    £24.00

    Excludes visit fee

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  • B

    Albumin

    ALB

    Albumin is the most abundant protein in the blood. It keeps fluid from leaking out of blood vessels; nourishes tissues; and transports hormones, vitamins, drugs, enzymes, and ions like calcium throughout the body. Albumin is made in the liver and is extremely sensitive to liver damage. The concentration of albumin drops when the liver is damaged, when a person is malnourished, or if a person experiences inflammation in the body. Albumin increases when a person is dehydrated.

    1 working day

    £26.00

    Excludes visit fee

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  • B

    Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

    ALP

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme found in high amounts in bone and liver. Smaller amounts of ALP are found in the placenta of women who are pregnant, and in the intestines. Each of these body parts makes different forms of ALP. The different forms are called isoenzymes.

    1 working day

    £26.00

    Excludes visit fee

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  • B

    ALT (Alanine Aminotransferase, SGPT)

    ALT

    ALT is an enzyme found mostly in the liver; smaller amounts are also found in the kidneys, heart, and muscles. When the liver is damaged, ALT is released into the bloodstream, hence increasing the concentration that can be detected in a blood test. This often happens before more obvious symptoms of liver damage occur, such as jaundice (yellowing of the eyes and skin).

    1 working day

    £26.00

    Excludes visit fee

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  • B

    AST (Aspartate Transaminase, SGOT)

    AST

    AST (aspartate aminotransferase) is an enzyme that is found mostly in the liver, but also in muscles. When your liver is damaged, it releases AST into your bloodstream. An AST blood test measures the amount of AST in your blood. The test can help your health care provider diagnose liver damage or disease.

    1 working day

    £26.00

    Excludes visit fee

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  • B

    Bicarbonate (tCO2)

    HCO3

    When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in the blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys. Its function is to help maintain the acid-base balance (pH) and to work with sodium, potassium, and chloride to maintain electrical neutrality at the cellular level. Measuring bicarbonate gives an estimation of acid-base balance. This is usually sufficient, but measurements of gasses dissolved in the blood may be done if more information is needed. Bicarbonate may be measured with sodium, potassium, and chloride in an electrolyte profile as it is the balance of these that gives your doctor the most information.

    1 working day

    £26.00

    Excludes visit fee

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